Outlandish

Journey by ~Rossipoo

Journey by ~Rossipoo


The Empire by ~geograpcics

The Empire by ~geograpcics

alternativeart:

Chris Achilleosselected by Alternative Art

alternativeart:

Chris Achilleos
selected by Alternative Art

First, when the pirates demanded a ransom of twenty talents, Caesar burst out laughing. They did not know, he said, who it was that they had captured, and he volunteered to pay fifty. Then, when he had sent his followers to the various cities in order to raise the money and was left with one…

gameraboy:

Rooftops, Rockets and Adventures beyond by Marek Denko
fakescience:

It’s time to take our big quiz: How will you accidentally destroy civilization?

national-archaeological-museum:

greek-museums:

National Archaeological Museum:

Mycenaean swords and hilts:

Fragment of a bronze sword. The hilt and shoulder are decorated in the cloissone technique, in which the scale compartments are inlaid with lapis lazuli. This elaborate design ends in lion or eagle-heads, from Mycenae.

Bronze dagger with golden decoration of feliformia in a landscape with bushes, from Pylos.

Gold hilt and pommel revetment of a long sword from Skopelos. The sword is decorated with repousse spirals and concentric circles. The gold sheet of the hilt from the hilt was donated by the Society of Friends of the National Archaeological Museum in 1938, while the pommel was discovered inside the tomb. 

Bronze dagger with a golden decoration of a marinescape with nautiluses, from Pylos.

Faience imitation of sword hilt with gold inlays, from Mycenae.

A long bronze sword with an elaborate gold hilt revetment, decorated with spirals and ending in lion-heads. Griffins adorn the blade, from Mycenae.

For some more mycenaean weapons see here and here

Just a quick reminder that posting for this blog has moved to greek-museums for renovation purposes.

whatthefauna:

An octopus will breed only once in its lifetime. A female will lay her eggs in a protected den and spend all of her time protecting, cleaning, and aerating the brood. She stops eating during this time, never for a moment leaves her young, and dies shortly after the brood hatches.
Researchers recently reported an octopus mother holding the record for the longest egg-brooding time: she cared for her eggs for 4.5 years until the brood hatched and she died.
Image credit: Kevin Lee

whatthefauna:

An octopus will breed only once in its lifetime. A female will lay her eggs in a protected den and spend all of her time protecting, cleaning, and aerating the brood. She stops eating during this time, never for a moment leaves her young, and dies shortly after the brood hatches.

Researchers recently reported an octopus mother holding the record for the longest egg-brooding time: she cared for her eggs for 4.5 years until the brood hatched and she died.

Image credit: Kevin Lee